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Tag Archives: 16th century english

What the apprentice wore- Pad Stitching part 2

…”Nor wear any silk lace or guard upon her gown, kirtle, waistcoat or petticoat, or any other garments, safe only a cape of velvet; nor any fardingal at all, either little or great, nor any body or sleeves of wire, whalebone or with any other stiffing, saving canvass or buckram only.” [1]

Pad stitching back panel- Notice the stitches are bigger and further apart. I don’t need as much support in the back.

Completed right side

[1] Some account of the Worshipful company of grocers of the city of London- BY BARON HEATH (John Benjamin Heath)

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Posted by on September 8, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

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What the apprentice wore- Pad Stitching

…”Nor wear any silk lace or guard upon her gown, kirtle, waistcoat or petticoat, or any other garments, safe only a cape of velvet; nor any fardingal at all, either little or great, nor any body or sleeves of wire, whalebone or with any other stiffing, saving canvass or buckram only.“[1]

Lack of bodies that have boning, reed or whalebone cuts down on the number of things that can be used to create breast support. Fortunately, canvas and buckram are fairly stiff and can be pad stitched. For this project I am using linen canvas. Smaller stitches provide greater support. I was dubious that this was going to work. But it has produced a layer that is much stronger with the pad stitching. And after a couple dozen stitches, I finally started getting the hang of it. Guidleines helped immensely.  I have one of 4 front panels completed. It took about 2 hours.

Basted with guidelines

Back side (which is actually the front as you sew it)

Front side- this will be next to the shift.

 
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Posted by on September 2, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

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What the apprentice wore- Coif

That none should wear on her head any lawn, cambrick, tiffany, velvet lawn, or white silk wires, either in any kerchief, koyfe, crest cloth, or shaddow, nor any linnen cloth therein, saving such linen cloth only, as should not exceed 5s. the ell, nor any lace or edging upon the same or any part thereof“… [1]

English ell is equal to 5⁄4 yard, or 1 ell= 1.25 yards.

£1 = 20 shillings (s)
1s = 12 pence/penny (d)

Measuring Worth [2], calculates a 16th century £1 = £199.10 in 2014 values. In US dollars £1 = $1.57, or $321.54 to £1 in the 16th century. [2] This mean a female would be restricted to linen that is under 5s per ell or modernly, $62.22 per 1.25 yards.

Linen used in this project retails for $9.75. It is a nice medium weight linen, with an even weave. It performs well in a work environment and holds up well under repeated laundering. I am using a basic woman’s coif pattern as seen in extant examples.
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O251169/coif-unknown/

Here is the completed coif and forehead cloth.
forehad hat

The edges have been left unadorned as per the requirement:
nor any lawne, velvet, tiffany, cobweblawne, nor white silk cipres at all, other than about their neck or otherwise ; nor any linnen cloth but of the price of 5s. the ell, or lace or edging whatsoever, but plain hem and one stitch “[1]

[1] Some account of the Worshipful company of grocers of the city of London- BY BARON HEATH  (John Benjamin Heath)
[2] Lawrence H. Officer and Samuel H. Williamson, “Five Ways to Compute the Relative Value of a UK Pound Amount, 1270 to Present,” MeasuringWorth, 2015. http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/relativevalue.php

 
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Posted by on August 25, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

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What the apprentice wore

As part of my A&S path, I am trying to put together a proper clothing kit for “Alesone.” She is a Grocer’s apprentice in 16th century London, England. There are a number of statutes she would be bound to follow, from class to trade for what she would be allowed to wear.  I am starting this dress diary to track the progress of her apprentice clothing. Let’s begin with what restrictions were placed upon her. https://sugarwricht.wordpress.com/2014/02/09/apprentices/.

And as with the other diaries, we begin with the intended design.This is a blue kirtle with a dark gray over dress. Starched whites complete the outfit. This represents a middle class English woman, appropriate to time, place, and station.
EnglishApprenticeDrGray

Design based upon the illustration by Lucas de Heere, Drawing of Four Citizen’s Wives, from his manuscript Corte Beschryuinghe van Engheland, Schotland, ende Irland, c.1574 located here.

 
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Posted by on August 25, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

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Swabian Dress #4: design in progress

The sleeve design is in full swing. Doing design mockups like this allow me to play with elements until I and the recipient are happy.  It also serves as the baseline for what the applique shapes will be.

What we have so far:


What’s left?  The background noise, of ivy leaves.  The leaf motif will carry to the front and back of the bodice.

 
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Posted by on November 7, 2012 in 15th century, Embroidery, Heraldic

 

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The “Pickle” dress- update

Completed dress:

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2009 in 16th Century, English, Sewing

 

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16th Century- English: The Pickle Dress

At Roses I had the pleasure of spending time with folks I respect and admire a lot. I also spent a bit of time admiring their properly constructed English garb. It seems that while you can find Elizabethan court garments fairly easily, finding good quality every day wear is not as simple to find. Either the corsets are too tight and create the wrong lines or the style is simply not right.

I’ve been sewing better and better garments… for everyone else. My new armor is nice and super comfy to wear, but I cannot wear that for 8 days at Pennsic. I realized that I should spend some of my sewing time on me and upgrade my kit. I have good garb, but mostly Tudor lines, which is just slightly out of the time period of my persona. It is also wool. Which while great winter, is going to be too hot for Pennsic. My Pennsic garb from last year was all sewn during a “I’m still loosing weight too fast so i have to sew everything 2 weeks before I go” marathon. I have a little more time to create things this time around. Last years clothes will be recycled into other garments for this year- it’s good linen and I don’t want to just throw it away. And it is perfectly period to recycle your garments into other garments.

I’ve been trying to come up with the correct descriptor for the color of the linen. But it is probably closest to “kosher pickle” green, though Matt calls it “pea soup” green. It is really a lot of green, but the white trim cuts up the visual lines nicely and offers an eye break to the pickle color. The sleeves are detachable with diagonal stripes. The sleeve caps square tabs (like dental molding).

Pickle dress:
Bodice
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Inspiration piece (I probably will not do the ruff):
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Posted by on June 25, 2009 in 16th Century, English, Sewing

 

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