RSS

Category Archives: English

What the apprentice wore- Pad Stitching part 2

…”Nor wear any silk lace or guard upon her gown, kirtle, waistcoat or petticoat, or any other garments, safe only a cape of velvet; nor any fardingal at all, either little or great, nor any body or sleeves of wire, whalebone or with any other stiffing, saving canvass or buckram only.” [1]

Pad stitching back panel- Notice the stitches are bigger and further apart. I don’t need as much support in the back.

Completed right side

[1] Some account of the Worshipful company of grocers of the city of London- BY BARON HEATH (John Benjamin Heath)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 8, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

Tags: , ,

What the apprentice wore- Pad Stitching

…”Nor wear any silk lace or guard upon her gown, kirtle, waistcoat or petticoat, or any other garments, safe only a cape of velvet; nor any fardingal at all, either little or great, nor any body or sleeves of wire, whalebone or with any other stiffing, saving canvass or buckram only.“[1]

Lack of bodies that have boning, reed or whalebone cuts down on the number of things that can be used to create breast support. Fortunately, canvas and buckram are fairly stiff and can be pad stitched. For this project I am using linen canvas. Smaller stitches provide greater support. I was dubious that this was going to work. But it has produced a layer that is much stronger with the pad stitching. And after a couple dozen stitches, I finally started getting the hang of it. Guidleines helped immensely.  I have one of 4 front panels completed. It took about 2 hours.

Basted with guidelines

Back side (which is actually the front as you sew it)

Front side- this will be next to the shift.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 2, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

Tags: , ,

What the apprentice wore- Coif

That none should wear on her head any lawn, cambrick, tiffany, velvet lawn, or white silk wires, either in any kerchief, koyfe, crest cloth, or shaddow, nor any linnen cloth therein, saving such linen cloth only, as should not exceed 5s. the ell, nor any lace or edging upon the same or any part thereof“… [1]

English ell is equal to 5⁄4 yard, or 1 ell= 1.25 yards.

£1 = 20 shillings (s)
1s = 12 pence/penny (d)

Measuring Worth [2], calculates a 16th century £1 = £199.10 in 2014 values. In US dollars £1 = $1.57, or $321.54 to £1 in the 16th century. [2] This mean a female would be restricted to linen that is under 5s per ell or modernly, $62.22 per 1.25 yards.

Linen used in this project retails for $9.75. It is a nice medium weight linen, with an even weave. It performs well in a work environment and holds up well under repeated laundering. I am using a basic woman’s coif pattern as seen in extant examples.
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O251169/coif-unknown/

Here is the completed coif and forehead cloth.
forehad hat

The edges have been left unadorned as per the requirement:
nor any lawne, velvet, tiffany, cobweblawne, nor white silk cipres at all, other than about their neck or otherwise ; nor any linnen cloth but of the price of 5s. the ell, or lace or edging whatsoever, but plain hem and one stitch “[1]

[1] Some account of the Worshipful company of grocers of the city of London- BY BARON HEATH  (John Benjamin Heath)
[2] Lawrence H. Officer and Samuel H. Williamson, “Five Ways to Compute the Relative Value of a UK Pound Amount, 1270 to Present,” MeasuringWorth, 2015. http://www.measuringworth.com/ukcompare/relativevalue.php

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 25, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

Tags: , ,

What the apprentice wore

As part of my A&S path, I am trying to put together a proper clothing kit for “Alesone.” She is a Grocer’s apprentice in 16th century London, England. There are a number of statutes she would be bound to follow, from class to trade for what she would be allowed to wear.  I am starting this dress diary to track the progress of her apprentice clothing. Let’s begin with what restrictions were placed upon her. https://sugarwricht.wordpress.com/2014/02/09/apprentices/.

And as with the other diaries, we begin with the intended design.This is a blue kirtle with a dark gray over dress. Starched whites complete the outfit. This represents a middle class English woman, appropriate to time, place, and station.
EnglishApprenticeDrGray

Design based upon the illustration by Lucas de Heere, Drawing of Four Citizen’s Wives, from his manuscript Corte Beschryuinghe van Engheland, Schotland, ende Irland, c.1574 located here.

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 25, 2015 in 16th Century, English

 

Tags: , ,

Champion’s Cassock

I have been working on a cassock that will become part of the barony’s rapier champion regalia. All that’s left is to attach the sleeves and paint the rapier logo on the front.

Project details:

  • Red linen cassock lined in black linen (Barony of Bhakail colors)
  • Pewter buttons
  • Applique flame and salamander logo
  • No standing collar

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 26, 2010 in 16th Century, English, Sewing

 

Tags: , , ,

Blackwork

I have been working on artwork for a black work cuff for a set of linen gloves. The artwork is wider than a cuff for my hand size should be. I have instead turned them into black work cuffs for a shift.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 22, 2010 in 16th Century, Embroidery, English, Sewing

 

Glove updates

Here is a picture of the glove in progress:

I am using a combination of stitches: standard fill, running and stem. I am using DMC black cotton tatting thread and DMC light effects light gold. Here is a close up of the embroidery:

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 11, 2010 in 16th Century, Embroidery, English, Sewing