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Category Archives: Recipes

Recipe collection- SCA and other

Menu- Spring Coronation 2013

Course 1
Rye bread, butter
Salat 20:  Cucumber salad (V, GF)
Salat 15:  Asparagus salad (V, GF)
Salat 45:  Radish salad (V, GF)
Cheese
Ham/sausage
Soup 46:  New cheese soup(V, GF)
Beef 64:  Beef dumplings (meatballs)

Course 2
Lamb 26:  Lamb with sage and cherry (served cold)
Hen 2:  Hen made in the Hungarian way
Pottage 13:  Peas and barley (V)
Pottage 37:  Earth apples (potato) (V available, GF)
Soup 45:  Cheese onion soup (V, GF available)

Course 3
Indian chicken 3:  Stuffed Turkey (served cold)
Pork 34:  Roast pork (served cold)
Pottage 81:  Barley and chicken
Pottage 126:  Lentils and pea broth (V, GF)
Soup 42:  Rice soup (V, GF)

Course 4
Confect 1:  Apple confect (V, GF)
Turten 8:  Apricot tart (V, GF available)
Pretzels (V)
Comfits (V, GF)
Marzipan:  (V, GF)

Source material Ein new Kuchbuch 1581, M.Marxen Rumpolt/ Churf. Meintzischen.
Digitized original manuscript- http://diglib.hab.de/wdb.php?dir=drucke/2-3-oec-2f
Nutzungsbedingungen für Online-Angebote der Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel

Transliteration and Translation,by Ranvaig Weaver mka Sharon Palmer, copyright 2013

Modern recipe conversion, Wendy Marques, 2013

Coronation Recipes

 
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Posted by on April 8, 2013 in Cooking, Menus, Recipes

 

White Gingerbread

To make white Ginger bread.
Take Gumma Dragantis* half an once, and steep it in rosewater two daies, then put thereto a pound of sugar beaten and finely serced, and beat them well together, so that it may be wrought like paste, then role it thin into two Cakes, then take a fewe Jordain almonds and blaunch them in colde water, then dry them with a faire Cloth, and stampe them in a mortar very finelye, adding thereto a little rosewater, beat finely also the whitest Sugar you can get and searce it.

Then take Ginger, pare it and beat it very small and serce it, them put in sugar to the almonds and beat them together very well, then take it out and work it at your pleasure, then lay it even upon one of your cakes, and cover it with an other and when you put it in the molde, strewe fine ginger both above and beneathe, if you have not great store of Sugar, then take Rice and beat i tsmall and serce it, and put it into the Morter and beat them altogether.
*Gumma Dragantis = gum traganth.

From: A book of cookrye Very necessary for all such as delight therin. Gathered by A.W. At London : Printed by Edward Allde, 1591

I brought the white gingerbread to our event this weekend and entered it in the cooking competition. It was a very big hit.The consensus is that it was tasty without being cloyingly sweet or rosy. I believe the key was the addition of the freshly ground dried ginger.

I had samples of the gum paste and the marzipan available to the judges and asked that they try the individual ingredient first prior to eating the confection. There was a sample of the ginger, which I also asked them to try. There is a brightness to the ginger when you grind it fresh. It retains some of
the properties of fresh ginger and it isn’t as pungent as the ground ginger you can buy anywhere. By trying each ingredient separately, I could show how all the components were needed to make the perfect bite.

I used a shallow chocolate mold for creating the shapes and trimmed out the pieces using a round cookie cutter. The over all confection was a tad smaller than a 1/2 dollar.

I will definitely be making this again.

Modern recipe
1 tsp gum tragacanth
1 tsp rosewater
1/4 cup water
1 lb powdered sugar
4 oz sugar
8 oz blanched almonds
2 tbl + 1 tsp rose water
2 tbl ground ginger

1. Combine tragacanth and waters together, let sit for 8-10 hours
2. Combine softened gum mixture with powder sugar. You may need more or less
than a pound.
3. Kneed mixture until a paste has been achieved.
4. Wrap in plastic wrap and put aside
5. Grind sugar, almonds and 1 tbl of ginger together until very fine
6. Add Rose water and bring mixture together to a sticky paste.
7. Roll out gum paste 1/8″ thick.
8. Cut out shapes
9. On a bottom piece, add almond/ginger paste 1/8″ thick.
10.Cover with a second piece of gum paste.
11.Dust candy/sugar/cookie mold with ginger
12.Press disk of gum paste into mold.
13.Trim edges and serve.

 
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Posted by on November 11, 2011 in Recipes, Sugar

 

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Confections: River Wars

I am looking at recipes for River Wars cooking competition. If I do not end up judging, I want to enter things in the sweets category. I figure one should not just be all sculpture all the time. Candy making is actually kinda cool and tricky. And that, makes it interesting.

Recipe #1: Nougat
Recipe for Mu’aqqad (Nougat) of Sugar*
Dissolve a ratl of sugar in two ratls of aromatic rosewater on a moderate fire, and when it is dissolved, strain it through a woolen cloth. Then return it to the fire and stir it gently until it is well cooked. Then remove it from the fire so that it cools slightly. Beat the whites of a dozen eggs in a dish until they give up their foam, and throw them on the melted sugar. Return it to the fire and beat it with the confectionery cane until it whitens and takes the consistency of ‘asîda and remove it from the fire and put in half a ratl of pistachios, if possible, and half a ratl of peeled almonds, and serve it forth, God willing.

The title of the recipe was translated into Nougat. Modern nougat is something akin to taffy. It is cooked to a very high temperature (300-330F), in a single cooked method. Divinity is probably closer in nature, lower temperature 250-260, and a double cooked method than nougat.

The first thing the recipe describes is a ratio. 1:2:1.5:1 sugar/water/egg/nut ratio. 1.5 of egg white where egg=24oz based upon large eggs. The ratio allows us to scale the recipe up or down, without needing to know what a ratl actually is (1 ratl = ~1lb). This recipe is also written in weights. This means the water and the egg whites should be measured by weight not volume.

The second thing that the recipe describes is a twice cooked candy. The first cooking dissolves the sugar and starts the chemical process of changing sugar water into cooked candy. It appears that the first cooking also helps to concentrate the sugar/water mixture. The second cooking, creates the actual finished candy product. ‘asîda= A mush of flour with a little boiling water, butter and honey. Based upon that description, this candy should probably be cooked somewhere between a modern firm and hard ball stage (~245-260).

It looks like the egg whites should be whipped as the sugar is cooling. Given the description of what the egg whites look like, they should be beaten until the form stiff peaks (egg whites will stand straight up when the whisk is held upside down). This process can take up to 10 minutes if whisking by hand.

Adding the nuts while the candy is still warm will make it easier to stir them in. It is possible that this candy is meant to be served still warm.

*Translated/published by David D. Friedman
An Anonymous Andalusian Cookbook (Andalusia, 13th c.)

Recipe #2: White Gingerbread
To make white Ginger bread.
Take Gumma Dragantis half an once, and steep it in rosewater two daies, then put thereto a pound of sugar beaten and finely serced, and beat them well together, so that it may be wrought like paste, then role it thin into two Cakes, then take a fewe Jordain almonds and blaunch them in colde water, then dry them with a faire Cloth, and stampe them in a mortar very finelye, adding thereto a little rosewater, beat finely also the whitest Sugar you can get and searce it. Then take Ginger, pare it and beat it very small and serce it, them put in sugar to the almonds and beat them together very well, then take it out and work it at your pleasure, then lay it even upon one of your cakes, and cover it with an other and when you put it in the molde, strewe fine ginger both above and beneathe, if you have not great store of Sugar, then take Rice and beat it small and serce it, and put it into the Morter and beat them altogether.

Alrighty then… This is not your typical gingerbread. It’s not even bread. This appears to be a gum paste variation, with a marzipan variation in the middle.

A standard gum paste recipe has egg white, lemon juice in addition to the sugar and the gum. So this recipe will probably be a little less pliable and possibly a lot more difficult to work with. Interestingly, they mention rice flour at the end of the recipe. It looks like this is a way to stretch the sugar while creating the paste part of the recipe.

Marzipan is a 2:1 ratio of nuts/sugar with rose water to moisten. This recipe calls for ginger to be added to the marzipan. At first I thought they were talking about fresh ginger. But by the time fresh ginger would have a chance to get from the Orient to England, it wouldn’t be fresh any more. Since they mention paring it and beating it, they are not talking about pre-powered ginger. It is probable then, that the ginger in question is actually dried, whole ginger.

The recipe also calls for ginger to be strewn above and below the gum paste layer before pressing it into the mold. I think caution will have to be exercised when creating this recipe. Too much ginger will create an heated effect on the palette. Not enough ginger and the sweetness of all the sugar will produce a cloying stickiness on the palette. There are so few ingredients in this treat that a delicate balance will be very important.

It will need to be eaten on or around the same day it is made. The gum paste, if left to the elements will dry out. And at that point, it will become dangerous to dental work.

 
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Posted by on September 29, 2011 in Recipes, Sugar

 

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Strauben von Mandeln

I started with a choux paste recipe, and started to substitute things out. Mainly because the recipes sound very similar to choux paste. There is some evidence that the french pastry has its roots in German cooking. Choux paste is a cooked pastry dough that is either baked or fried. I had my doubts when I substituted the almond/rice milk in place of regular dough. But it came out fantastic! The results were a lighter, more delicate dough.

Documentation for Strauben von Mandeln

 
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Posted by on March 13, 2010 in Cooking, Recipes

 

Course recipes

Here are the full recipes for courses 1-3. These are the recipes only, not the full documentation.

Course 1
Course 2
Course 3

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2009 in Cooking, Recipes, Yule

 

Turkie

Turkey is “traditionally” a new world food, and therefore usually not served at most SCA feasts. However turkeys were domesticated in Europe in the early 1520s and, by 1558 was becoming popular at banquets in England and throughout Europe. Recipe here.

turkie4

Larding a turkey, or “put into it good store of butter “. Turkey is a very lean meat. Larding the meat adds an additional layer of moisture. Separate the skin (but do not remove) between the breast and the turkey. Add compound butter in this area, and rub over the whole breast. Smooth skin back over the buttered breast.
Larding

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2009 in Cooking, Recipes, Yule

 

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Beef pasties

This pasty is made in 4 parts, meat, sauce, pastry and then putting them together. This allows for things to be made in batches independently from each other. It is done for efficiency, as the filling can be frozen ahead of time, and thawed prior to use. Pastry dough while able to be frozen, has a harder time recovering from the thawing process and is better when made a day or so prior to usage. Full recipe here.

Pies

 
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Posted by on November 1, 2009 in Cooking, Recipes, Yule