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Monthly Archives: October 2013

Confectionary armatures: wood form experiment goes mostly wrong

This weekend, I was asked about the process I went through on my journey to find the most ideal materials for doing armatures. One of the things I was asked if I tried was wood. It is mentioned that some of the early armatures used wood as a base. And at the time, I had forgotten about the small king I made to slay a dragon.  As I thought more about it, I remembered that yes, I had tried using a wood form for an armature, and had blocked the memory because of the trouble I had getting the sugar to adhere to the form.

Edward slays the dragon.

The small sugar king, has a wooden form to assist with the general shape and pose of a longsword attack. A 10″ wooden art manikin was used as the base.

Wooden-Manikin

The base was removed from the form. The wood pieces were sanded to remove all of the varnish. The manikin was posed into a mid-swing, German longsword movement.

The first attempt at sugar application was directly to the sanded wood. The sugar would not stick. There was not enough grip to the under surface for the sugar to make a solid bind. It peeled off the form, like bad paint peels from a wall that has not been properly primed.

The second attempt came after priming the surface with paper mache. I knew that sugar could grip the paper form my earlier attempts with the metal armatures. However, the paper mache would not stick to the surface either.

The third attempt came after a rasp was taken to the entire form.  This created uneven surfaces in the wood. The sugar stuck, but when it was dry it would not stay in position. It slid off the form.

The fourth and final attempt was a combination of priming the surface with a tempera paint, a layer of paper mache sealed with glare, followed by the sugar paste. The surface of the sugar was a bit bumpy than it normal would be as there was only one layer of sugar. The sugar was “smoothed” by burnishing it with water while it was still pliable. Normally, there would be a second layer of sugar for the fine details, but given the unexpected layer of paper mache, a second sugar layer would have give the figure unwanted bulk.

If I were to attempt to use a wooden form again, I would probably use a layer of plaster mesh or possibly starched linen as a barrier between the wood and the sugar. This would probably give me a solid surface for the sugar to adhere.

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Posted by on October 28, 2013 in Sugar

 

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Updated: Confection research

Updated the research paper, now with experimental research. Paper has increased by 13 pages. The next version will probably have more about the various classes and their build or buy tendencies.

Confections

 
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Posted by on October 15, 2013 in Sugar, Uncategorized

 

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Heraldic gown- German early 16th century: 3 yards of Heraldry

This is what 3 yards of heraldry looks like from the 2nd floor balcony. The center line represents the back of the dress and the change in armory. The ermines are appliques also. The dress has been completely appliqued. The dress has been built. All that is needed are the final touches of trim added. This is the part that will take the longest.

Heraldry

Design Phase

The dress has been completed and you can see it here: This is Yehuda getting his Silver Crescent (OHM for service in the East). Photo taken by Hugh Tauerner.

What’s all the heraldry mean:
Right side panel- Who am I?
Alesone’s arms- Quarterly gules and sable, on a bend sinister argent three fleurs-de-lys gules. Those are Florentine fleurs, they look a bit like lobsters with jazz hands (yeah, there’s a story behind those).

Left side panel- My associations (aka-who I’ve been “licked by”)
Front 1/2
Aly Macintosh’s badge- (Fieldless) A bear rampant gules charged with an ermine spot argent. This was put on a yellow feild to show that I am a protege.

Back 1/2 Top-
Ian Raven’s cadet mark- My position is the 6th child of Ian Raven, which is represented by the fleur-de-lys.My cadet scarf is marked by Ian’s ermine spot and raven, with the fleur on top.

Back 1/2 Bottom-
Donovan Shinnock’s badge-  (Fieldless) A fox’s mask gules charged with a mascle argent.This was put on a green field as that is one of his primary device colors.When my Don moved out of kingdom, I entered into the age old system of “fostering”.

 
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Posted by on October 11, 2013 in 16th Century, German, Heraldic, Uncategorized

 

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