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Poured sugar- Yule continued

29 Nov

The piece for feast has been mostly completed. Depending on the weather, I will decide whether to pour a top coat or just leave it as is. It is pretty humid and the sugar is absorbing moisture. This is causing weeping and severe crystallization. This second piece is based upon our menu scroll for feast.

Step 1- Grid lines

Step 2- Pouring the sugar glass

Step 3- Completed Salamander

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4 Comments

Posted by on November 29, 2011 in Poured sugar

 

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4 responses to “Poured sugar- Yule continued

  1. Shoshana

    November 30, 2011 at 6:00 pm

    I can’t wait for Saturday! Great Blog!

     
    • Alysten

      November 30, 2011 at 10:16 pm

      Thank you for stopping by. I hope you have a great time at our event.
      ~Ale

       
  2. Adalia VonDemBerg

    February 7, 2012 at 3:20 pm

    Do you have documentation for this type of poured sugar work? Specifically, a poured sugar stained glass window effect mentioned somewhere?

     
    • Alysten

      February 7, 2012 at 3:32 pm

      Hi,

      This is not one of my sugar projects that is specifically a historical representation of period sugar work. It is work that is designed to be an edible subtlety and serves as a practice element for me working with boiled sugar. I use the technique to see how I can blend different elements (in this case gum paste and boiled sugar) into a cohesive entity. I am using a modern food coloring, but it is possible to use period food additives to achieve color. There are a lot of mention of sculpture and small designs done in period and they seem to not be as careful about cyrstalization. There is much more evidence of things like the poured chess pieces as they are molded.

      There are other folks out there that have more experience in creating boiled sugar art. I do it for select pieces, for the stained glass effect. Not because it is a period representation of this type of boiled sugar art. It is the case of period-esq, not perfectly period. And people seem to enjoy the art and the sugar when the piece is broken into bite sized pieces.

      Does this make sense?
      Alesone

       

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