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Monthly Archives: April 2009

Medieval candies- update

I have made each type of candy and wow… what an experience. The Cryfpes are indeed chewy and the ginger pine nut combination is really nice. The Pynades are thin medieval lollipops of goodness. The documentation has been completed and is rather light by my other papers.

So what did I learn?

  • Honey has a faster boiling time than sugar or honey/sugar.
  • Putting the spices in as the candy is cooking infuses the flavor more thouroughly and ensures equal distribution of the spice.
  • Pine nuts float.
  • Honey candy is stickier than sugar candy.
  • Measuring sugar state is not complicated, but is much easier when you are using a candy thermometer. Sadly my is broken, and I had to do this the old fasioned way.
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Posted by on April 20, 2009 in Cooking

 

Pâte à choux, Custard and Snowe

Aka profiteroles. I made the cinnamon pastry custard last night. Its a little loose, but still the “required” thickness for a cooked (not baked) custard. I added a little corn starch to the recipe for stability. I have to transport these little guys 4 hours in a car, 3 hours in cold storage until they can actually be served, and then 2-3 hours out in the open. I am not going to enter them into the “nobodies fool” competition as they are just a little to “probable” for period. I can place all the components and actual references to profiteroles, but… Considering how many problems I’v had with the baklava, better safe than questioned to death.

 
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Posted by on April 20, 2009 in Cooking

 

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Manchetts

This is a basic 16th century white bread recipe. This documentation discusses the period ingredients, units of measurements, and the modern recipe transformation.
Documentation and recipes: Elizabethan Manchettes

 
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Posted by on April 20, 2009 in Recipes

 

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Flemish work dress

I am a utilitarian SCAdian. I make garb that fits the task, not necessarily my persona or time period.

* My fencing jackets are late 16th century. The soldier’s coat is versatile, can be worn with pants or skirts, can handle a belt. Also good for doing black powder work as it covers everything.
* My court wear is Elizabethan. My persona is 1580s. I like the hoop and velvet look. Not so fond of the bum roll, but I can usually get away with the wool or the velvet with just a hoop. Its what I wear when I need to be in period/persona, and have to clean up well.
* My camping clothing is Tudor. Easiest garb in the world to sew is mid 16th century lower class. When you need a lot of garb fast, this is the era.
* My newest fencing dress is 15 century Kampfrau. It has function of being both stripey and mid calf. Perfect for fencing as the long sleeves tuck into the gloves well.

The next project I have scheduled for me is a Flemish work dress. I need something I can work in. Something I can push over my elbows and bare my arms. Nothing’s worse than working in a kitchen with your sleeves hanging in the food and you head not properly covered (i’ve spent too much time in a commercial kitchen to compromise on some things). So while looking at patterns for oaken_glen’s crown dress, I found the perfect costume. Flemish: Under kirtle with sleeves rolled up, over kirtle with short sleeves and tucked up skirts, apron, and linen head scarf tied like a bandanna (all hair out of the face and covered). Perfect!

I have never sewn Flemish, though all the cool kids wear it. I have resisted being just like everyone else, but I think with the rolled up sleeves, apron, and simple head scarf, it will be different enough that I’ll feel ok wearing it. It is the sleeves that have sold me. I will probably make it a dark-ish/food safe color combination, with the white of the apron (which I can bleach and will probably make 2 layers as it will probably double as a dish/hand towel and pot holder). But again its about function. I need something I can work in. Just like there are some costumes I wouldn’t fence in (or recommend people fence in)no matter how cool they look (codpieces anyone?). It will need to be breathable, so I’m probably going with the ole stand by of linen. I know they would have used wool… but really people, have you ever worked in a kitchen environment when its over 120 degrees and rising? I have, its not pretty and I refuse to melt into the food. I will post picture as the project gets underway. First I have to pick the delicious fabric that will become my kitchen/working garb, and then I have some research to do.

 
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Posted by on April 20, 2009 in Sewing

 

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Elizabethan sleeves and cawl

A representation of beading as would have been worn on detachable sleeves and cawl in Elizabethan England. These garments are designed to be interchangeable and will be worn with different gowns. The garments follow Elizabethan sumptuary laws statutes 1 and 2.

Completion hours
• Research and documentation- 15-20 hours
• Sleeves- 100 hours
• Cawl- 30 hours

Documentation: Beaded sleeves and cawl

 
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Posted by on April 20, 2009 in Sewing

 

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Small cakes

This is a small cake recipe. Small cakes are a pastry resembling modern cookies. They are a very sweet pastry with a hint of spice. This documentation discusses the period ingredients, units of measurements, and the modern recipe transformation.

Documentation with recipe: Small Cakes

 
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Posted by on April 14, 2009 in Recipes

 

Pâte à choux, Custard and Snowe

This is a look at profiteroles- pâte à choux, that were served in the 16th century France. These are presented with 2 period fillings, custard and snowe.

Documentation with recipe: Profiteroles

 
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Posted by on April 10, 2009 in Recipes

 

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